Weekend Roundup: November 20, 2020

This Week in the Unmanned Systems and Robotics World

Students and faculty at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia are working on an autonomous vehicle that can transport the elderly. The JMU Autonomous Cart (JACart) research group tested its second autonomous (AV) golf cart on the university’s campus in a fixed course on Wednesday, Nov. 18. (WHSV-TV)

The Drive has come across a Toyota patent that outlines a system by which an autonomous drone could be automatically dispatched to refuel or recharge stranded gasoline- or battery-powered vehicles. According to the Drive, the patent claims this sort of system could find use in autonomous vehicles. It doesn't say it couldn't work for regular vehicles. (The Drive)

The Jefferson County Emergency Management Agency (JCEMA) in Jefferson Country, Alabama has a new drone for public safety. Public safety entities across Jefferson County will be able to request the drone, a DJI Matrice 300 equipped with a Zenmuse H20 camera, any time it is needed. (The Trussville Tribune)

F-drones recently announced that on Nov. 1, it completed the world’s first commercial drone delivery at night in Singapore. The company helped deliver a critical part for Wilhelmsen to a vessel owned by Berge Bulk known as Berge Sarstein. (F-drones)

Boeing, EpiSci, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Heron Systems, and physicsAI recently received contracts from DARPA to develop algorithms enabling mixed teams of manned and unmanned combat aircraft to conduct aerial dogfighting autonomously. Under Technical Area (TA) 1 of DARPA’s Air Combat Evolution (ACE) program, the companies will develop air combat maneuvering algorithms for individual and team tactical behaviors. (DARPA)

QinetiQ has announced that on Nov. 5, it formally delivered the first of four experimental Robotic Combat Vehicles (Light) to the Army. The vehicles will be used alongside four Textron-built RCV-Mediums in field tests. (Breaking Defense)

Photo below: ​DARPA recently awarded contracts to five companies to develop algorithms enabling mixed teams of manned and unmanned combat aircraft to conduct aerial dogfighting autonomously. Photo: DARPA

 

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