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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 23, 2017 Contact: Tom McMahon, tmcmahon@auvsi.org , (571) 255-7786 AUVSI Statement on Senate FAA Reauthorization Bill Legislation looks to future uses of UAS technology, coordinated spectrum for small UAS ARLINGTON, Va — Brian Wynne, president and CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), issued the following statement on the unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) provisions in the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act of 2017 (S. 1405), which was introduced yesterday by the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee: “Like the House FAA reauthorization bill, the U.S. Senate bill demonstrates a strong, sustained commitment for the safe and responsible growth of commercial UAS in the United States. The bill contains several provisions that will help lay the foundation for more complex operations, such as mandating a coordinated effort between the FAA, FCC, and NTIA to report on spectrum needs for small UAS. “Congress has clearly embraced the need to propel the country forward on the march toward full UAS integration, including beyond-line-of-sight operations, flights over people, access to higher altitudes and even package delivery. We look forward to working with both the House and the Senate to realize the full potential of UAS.” # # # About AUVSI The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) — the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of unmanned systems and robotics — represents more than 7,500 members from more than 60 countries involved in the fields of government, industry and academia. AUVSI members work in the defense, civil and commercial markets. For more information, visit
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Tweet by AUVSI News   Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) working out of professor Yasamin Mostofi’s lab have conducted a demonstration in which they used two UAS working in tandem, and WiFi, to capture the three-dimensional imaging of objects through walls. In their experiment, which the results of that and the proposed methodology appeared in the Association for Computing Machinery/Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN), researchers use two autonomous octocopters to fly outside of an enclosed, four-sided brick house whose interior is foreign to the UAS. According to the researchers, “one copter continuously transmits a WiFi signal, the received power of which is measured by the other copter for the purpose of 3D imaging.” After traveling a few proposed routes, the UAS use imaging methodology developed by the researchers to not only reveal the area behind the walls, but also to generate 3D high-resolution images of the objects inside. The researchers say that the 3D image closely matches the actual area. “This approach utilizes only WiFi RSSI measurements, does not require any prior measurements in the area of interest and does not need objects to move to be imaged,” Mostofi says through an article with the UC Santa Barbara school website . Four tightly integrated key components are the heart of the researchers’ strategy to enable 3D through-wall imaging. To start, they proposed robotic paths that can “capture the spatial variations in all the three dimensions as much as possible, while maintaining the efficiency of the operation.” Second, to capture the spatial dependencies, the researchers molded the three-dimensional unknown area of interest as a Markov Random Field, and used a graph-based belief propagation approach “to update the imaging decision of each voxel (the smallest unit of a 3D image) based on the decisions of the neighboring voxels.” Third, the researchers used a linear wave model to “approximate the interaction of the transmitted wave with the area of interest.” Lastly, the researchers “took advantage of the compressibility of the information content to image the area with a very small number of WiFi measurements.” Being able to use UAS and WiFi for 3D through-wall imaging could have a variety of use cases, including for structural monitoring, archaeological discovery, and search and rescue missions. << Back to
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 21, 2017 Contact: Tom McMahon, tmcmahon@auvsi.org , (571) 255-7786 AUVSI Statement on UAS Provisions in House FAA Reauthorization Bill Measure would pave way for UAS Traffic Management System WASHINGTON — Brian Wynne, president and CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), issued the following statement on the unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) provisions in the 21st Century Aviation Innovation, Reform & Reauthorization (AIRR) Act (H.R. 2997), which was introduced today by the U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. “The provisions for UAS in the House version of the FAA reauthorization bill represent a strong and sustained commitment for the growth of commercial UAS in the United States. The bill calls for UAS initiatives that would build upon the work that industry has already been engaged with NASA and the FAA, particularly the section that mandates rulemaking for a UAS Traffic Management (UTM) system. “In advance of a rule to implement UTM, the bill would allow the FAA to grant waivers for low-risk UTM operations. This is a responsible and reasonable approach to UAS integration that will help expand the operational envelope and enhance the safety of the national airspace for all users – manned and unmanned.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 21, 2017 Contact: Tom McMahon, tmcmahon@auvsi.org , (571) 255-7786 AUVSI CEO to Deliver Remarks at Drone World Congress in Shenzhen Wynne will also meet Chinese companies exhibiting at AUVSI’s XPONENTIAL SHENZHEN, China — Brian Wynne, president and CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), will deliver a keynote address on Friday, June 23, at the Drone World Congress 2017 in Shenzhen, China. The conference will bring together delegates from around the world to discuss the latest advances in unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) technology. AUVSI, the world’s largest non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of unmanned systems and robotics, represents more than 7,500 members from more than 60 countries, including China. Wynne will provide attendees of the Drone World Congress with a snapshot of the current state of the UAS industry in the United States, its regulatory framework and the commercial applications of the technology that are anticipated in the future. “I am excited to once again visit Shenzhen to speak at the Drone World Congress,” Wynne said. “I look forward to discussing opportunities for companies and stakeholders around the world to capitalize on the vast potential that the UAS industry in the United States stands to offer.” An AUVSI report on the economic impact of commercial UAS has forecasted the industry to create more than 100,000 new jobs and more than $82 billion in economic impact within the first ten years following UAS integration into the U.S. airspace. The Drone World Congress 2017 will be held jointly with the Shenzhen International UAV Expo 2017. Attendees across academia, government, and industry will discuss topics surrounding the development of UAS technology, including for commercial uses such as agriculture, environmental protection, surveying, public safety and energy. Over 20,000 people are expected to attend the expo. While Wynne is in China, he will meet with Sunshine International Trade Show Promotion Co., Ltd. The company is a partner with AUVSI on XPONENTIAL, the association’s trade show and conference, which is held annually in the United States. Last month in Dallas, Texas, more than 7,500 industry leaders and professionals from over 650 cutting-edge companies, representing more than 55 countries, came together at XPONENTIAL 2017 to showcase innovations in unmanned systems. Sunshine helped organize the show’s China Pavilion, which included exhibits of the latest developments in Chinese robotics technology. Sunshine is currently working with Chinese companies that are planning to participate in XPONENTIAL 2018, which will take place at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver. Educational programs will run April 30 to May 3, with exhibits open from May 1 to 3. For more information, visit www.xponential.org . # # # About AUVSI The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) — the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of unmanned systems and robotics — represents more than 7,500 members from more than 60 countries involved in the fields of government, industry and academia. AUVSI members work in the defense, civil and commercial markets. For more information, visit A
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Tweet by AUVSI News   Intel has announced a long-term technology partnership with the International Olympic Committee (IOC), which will, among many things, bring Intel’s drone light show technology to future Olympic games, in an effort to create “never-seen-before images in the sky.” Through the partnership, which is expected to “transform the Olympic Games and the Olympic experience," Intel will join “The Olympic Partner” (TOP) worldwide sponsorship program, and thus, become a Worldwide TOP Partner through 2024.   “We are excited to join the Olympic Movement and integrate Intel’s innovative technologies to advance the Olympic Games experience for fans around the world,” says Brian Krzanich, Intel’s chief executive officer . “Through this close collaboration with the Olympic family, we will accelerate the adoption of technology for the future of sports on the world’s largest athletic stage.”  Besides incorporating UAS into the Olympic experience, Intel will put much of its effort and energy into “infusing its 5G platforms, VR, 3D and 360-degree content development platforms, artificial intelligence platforms, along with other silicon solutions to enhance the Olympic Games.”  “Thanks to our new innovative global partnership with Intel, fans in the stadium, athletes and audiences around the world will soon experience the magic of the Olympic Games in completely new ways,” says IOC President Thomas Bach. “Intel is a world leader in its field, and we’re very excited to be working with the Intel team to drive the future of the Olympic Games through cutting-edge technology.”  Intel’s technology is expected to be used initially in February 2018 at the Olympic Winter Games Pyeongchang 2018, in South Korea, to “provide real-time virtual reality viewing of the Olympic Winter Games.” << Back to
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 21, 2017 Contact: Tom McMahon, tmcmahon@auvsi.org , (571) 255-7786 AUVSI Statement on New Aviation Rulemaking Committee for Remote Identification Standards for UAS WASHINGTON — Brian Wynne, president and CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI), today issued the following statement on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)’s announcement of a new Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) to explore remote identification standards for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS): “AUVSI is proud to participate in the latest Aviation Rulemaking Committee, which is yet another example of government and industry collaboration to address complex issues involving UAS. Developing standards for remotely identifying operators and owners of UAS builds upon earlier registration efforts with real-time tracking of UAS operators. These important security measures will pave the way for expanded UAS operations, including flights over people and beyond-line-of-sight operations. “AUVSI was also a part of the FAA’s registration task force, which provided recommendations for establishing a rule requiring UAS operators to register before taking to the skies. In addition, AUVSI participated in the micro UAS ARC to develop recommendations for flights over people. We look forward to continuing to work with stakeholders on the remote identification ARC to further increase accountability across the entire aviation community and enhance the safety of the national airspace.” AUVSI recently issued a call for papers on remote identification solutions for UAS to work with its members and other stakeholders to help the FAA meet its congressional directive to set forth standards as outlined in Section 2202 of P.L. 114-90, the 'FAA Extension, Safety and Security Act of 2016' . The first meeting of the ARC is being held this week in Washington, D.C. For more information about the ARC and a full list of its members, click here . # # # About AUVSI The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) — the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of unmanned systems and robotics — represents more than 7,500 members from more than 60 countries involved in the fields of government, industry and academia. AUVSI members work in the defense, civil and commercial markets. For more information, visit A
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Tweet by AUVSI News   3D Robotics (3DR) has announced a new partnership with one of Japan’s largest distributors of information and communications technology, SoftBank C&S, which will result in 3DR providing its Site Scan UAS data platform to AEC professionals in Japan. Site Scan will be the only commercial UAS software offered by SoftBank, which will open up the power of UAS data to Softbank’s customers across Japan. “Aerial data software like Site Scan is already driving productivity for our customers in Japan,” says Matt Harrison, Head of Sales at 3DR . “The partnership with SoftBank will allow 3DR to meet the demand for drone data across the country.” Recently, the 3DR sales team joined SoftBank C&S on its national Site Scan roadshow. During the roadshow, demonstrations of Site Scan were conducted across Japan, in collaboration with Autodesk and 3DR’s authorized distributor in Japan, Shibamoto & Co. “SoftBank is an established, innovative firm with a strong track record of success, and it’s great to see their initial traction with the Site Scan roadshow,” says 3DR CEO Chris Anderson. “We look forward to continuing to develop our partnership with them to help drive productivity on construction projects across Japan.” According to 3DR, the timing of this partnership is perfect, since Japan will host the 2020 Olympics. The country has been experiencing a building boom, but there is a significant labor shortage within the construction industry. To confront this issue, the Japanese government launched an initiative known as “i-Construction” in 2015, to help increase worker productivity by 50% within the understaffed industry. UAS play an important role in this initiative. << Back to
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Tweet by AUVSI News   Kongsberg Maritime’s HUGIN AUV has been selected by the University of Gothenburg, and the AUV will be used to expand the capabilities of Sweden in the field of marine research, using unmanned vehicles and platforms. The AUV, which is expected to be delivered in February 2018, will be recognized “as a national asset for marine research projects around Sweden and further afield.” “In order to map the ocean environment to the degree that vital climate change research requires, we need to focus more on increasing our use of autonomous observation platforms,” says  Anna Wåhlin, Professor in Oceanography, University of Gothenburg, through an article from Marine Technology News . “Our new HUGIN AUV will significantly expand our ability to map ice, seabed, and explore marine environments previously inaccessible to us. We are confident that HUGIN will become an important tool in our on-going research in waters closer to Sweden, for example, in the Skagerrak and the Baltic Sea in addition to projects in the Antarctic and Arctic." The HUGIN AUV chosen by the University of Gothenburg has a configuration rated to 3,000 meters, and a range of up to 300 kilometers. The AUV will be equipped with an advanced Kongsberg navigation system, as well as a comprehensive package of instruments and sensors from Kongsberg and third parties. Kongsberg is also expected to deliver a “HUGIN Operator Station (HOS) Payload Operator Station (POS) and Acoustic Positioning Operator Station (APOS) for communication and full control of the HUGIN and payload from the mothership.” Grants from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation will fund the HUGIN AUV, and a project team with representatives from the University of Gothenburg, Chalmers University of Technology and Stockholm University will manage the AUV. << Back to
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Tweet General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc. (GA-ASI) has selected the Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion integrated avionics system to support the company’s MQ-9B SkyGuardian UAS. In an effort to simply civil airspace access, Rockwell Collins will offer support to GA-ASI to “efficiently upgrade the proven Predator B Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) system.” The UAS ground control station will utilize the capabilities of the Rockwell Collins Pro Line Fusion integrated avionics system, to support customers and missions that require operations in civil airspace. “Our Pro Line Fusion avionics bring a proven, civil-certified pedigree from manned aviation to unmanned systems,” says Dave Schreck, vice president and general manager, Airborne Solutions, for Government Systems at Rockwell Collins . “The flexibility of the system enables its application for UAS.” Features of the platform will include interactive touch-control displays, and a Flight Management System "to support Instrument Flight Rules flight in today’s airspace." UAS operators will have their workload minimized thanks to the intuitive operator interface and interactive touchscreen map, and they will also have access to “civil airspace features integrated with the graphical presentation of the existing ground control station.” “This program with GA-ASI will help pave the way and set the standards for UAS platforms accessing controlled civil airspace,” Schreck adds. << Back to the News Rockwell Collins’ Pro Line Fusion® integrated avionics for the SkyGuardian™ will feature touch-control displays and a proven FMS. Photo Courtesy of Rockwell Collins << Back
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Tweet During the Bayonet Focus (BF) 17-03 exercise, Shadow UAS operators and maintainers of 7th Infantry Division worked on their skillset at the Yakima Training Center in Washington, at a recently built UAS airfield. Imagery support for units conducting the BF 17-03 exercise was provided by the soldiers, which gave UAS personnel and service members in the field more realistic training. “This is different than training back at Joint Base Lewis-McChord because we are in a more tactical setting and we move a lot faster,” says Spc. Brysen Borja, a UAS operator with 2-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team, via DVIDSHub.net . “The biggest difference is that we are always receiving a mission from a unit somewhere to get eyes on targets or help them find something.” According to Borja, the imagery saves lives, as it allows units under attack to redirect and engage the enemy “in the best way possible.” 1st Lt. Kimberly Covey, UAS platoon leader with 1-2 SBCT, explains this by saying, “as far as the Soldiers on the ground are concerned, the Shadow [UAS] helps them visualize the battlefield as well as help them conduct reconnaissance.” “They know where the enemy is located; this enables them to plan better and conduct their operations.” Through this training, the platoons also got an opportunity to see what it’s like to operate with two platoons on one site, which is something that they don’t get to do very often. Covey says that that aspect of the training was extremely helpful as well. “It has been beneficial seeing how two platoons working side by side can get multiple aircraft in the air, especially when we are sharing a limited amount of space,” Covey says. Overall, this training was extremely invaluable for everyone involved. “We have come a long way in the past couple days,” says Chief Warrant Officer Daniel Page, Brigade Aviation Element UAS Representative for 2-2 SBCT. “A lot of gaps have been filled.” << Back to the News Spc. Joshua Collins (right), an Unmanned Aerial System Maintainer with 2-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team, performs preflight checks on a Shadow UAS with Staff Sgt. Eric Ross, a platoon sergeant also with 2-2 SBCT, Photo Courtesy of DVIDSHub.net << Back
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Tweet First responders from New Jersey took part in a simulated post-disaster scenario on Tuesday where an unmanned aircraft provided cell phone connectivity, something often lacking in the wake of natural disasters. The exercise was a joint venture of Verizon, drone services provider American Aerospace Technologies and the Cape May Office of Emergency Management. “Every time there’s a major incident, the biggest drawback is communications,” said Marty Pagluighi, director of the Cape May County Office of Emergency Management. “So any kind of communication enhancements we’re willing to look at. And if we can help them advance this technology, it gives us another tool as emergency managers.” A fixed-wing RS 20 UAS provided by American Aerospace Technologies took off from Woodbine Municipal Airport in Cape May County (accompanied by a chase plane) and then flew over the area. First responders from state police, the U.S. Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay and Cape May County Office of Emergency Management watched the takeoff and then moved to the nearby Belleplain State Forest, where Verizon simulated a cell phone outage. Verizon provided the first responders with Samsung S6 cell phones that were attuned to the cell phone system broadcaster located on the aircraft. When they first arrived at a recreational field in the forest, the phones had no service. Once the drone was overhead, they were able to make calls, send texts and make social media posts and even stream video. “I encourage you to Snapchat to your heart’s content,” said Christopher Desmond, principal engineer for Verizon Network Operations. David Yoel, founder and CEO of American Aerospace, said the payload on the vehicle — Verizon’s Airborne LTE, dubbed a “flying cell site,” engineering to provide cell service to the ground from an aircraft — would support up to 68 users at once. During the exercise, 39 people logged on, including some people in the park who weren’t part of the operation but just happened to stumble onto the signal. During the exercise, Verizon also simulated a lost connection, briefly stopping the transmission and then picking it back up again. The first responders wandered around to various areas of the park to test the bounds of the network as the RS 20 and its chase plane flew circles overhead. Frank Donato, an emergency system manager from Ocean City, said a few years back the South Jersey area was hit both by Hurricane Irene and the aftershocks from an earthquake centered in northern Virginia. “Everybody was trying to figure out what happened,” and bogged down the cell phone system, Donato said. “That impacts us as first responders, emergency managers. So this is a great exercise and opportunity to see how drone technology can restore those vital lines of communication and free up the space on the network to be able to make those calls and have them go through.” After the main exercise, American Aerospace demonstrated another capability, that of sending video from a quadcopter to the orbiting fixed-wing drone and then sending it back to the command center at the emergency management office. The vehicle was also able to track the flight of the RS 20 overhead and send that data back. That could come in handy in various scenarios, such as if an emergency responder was cut off on a barrier island but needed to send video to other first responders, American Aerospace’s Yoel said. << Back to ...
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Tweet by AUVSI News   Kespry has formally entered into the insurance sector, which will allow the company to “extend its end-to-end and easy-to-use enterprise drone platform by offering insurance specific functionality such as inspection-quality imagery for roofing and automated analysis to assist claim adjusters.” The Kespry UAS captures data that delivers high-resolution imagery with 1 mm per pixel resolution, which can detect physical damage and granule loss. Rooftop imagery is available onsite in less than 10 minutes, giving field and desk adjusters access to comprehensive roof dimensions and automated damage detection. Kespry’s entry into the insurance sector comes after exhaustive field tests and insurance specific improvements that were designed in partnership with various customers and industry leaders, such as AMAT Roofing, CRU Adjusters, Hancock Claims Consultants and Superstorm Restoration. “The easy-to-use and fully-integrated Kespry Drone Platform enables major industrial companies to collect more accurate information, more frequently, efficiently and safely,” says George Mathew, CEO and chairman of Kespry . “This drives greater cost savings and business value.” Kespry’s move into the insurance industry comes while the company is actively improving its cloud platform, as it has made significant upgrades in scalability, security and reliability. The platform is ideal for comprehensive aerial intelligence applications, as it has the mapping, rendering, data analysis and analytics capabilities necessary for these applications. One of the main features that Kespry is touting about the new Kespry cloud is its ability to automatically identify hail damage, thanks to sophisticated machine learning algorithms and artificial intelligence designed specifically for this functionality. The claims process can be completed in just a few simple steps, thanks to customized wireframes being quickly produced for the entire roof, and automated dimension reports being instantly available for high accuracy measurements. This allows insurers to “seamlessly move data into common estimate generation software and claims management systems” to complete the claims process. “Now, insurers can dramatically improve the policyholder experience through shortened claim cycles while also reducing loss adjustment expenses and minimizing liabilities and risks for field staff,” Mathew says. Kespry says that its field-to-finish experience is the “only fully automated aerial intelligence solution designed to improve the property and casualty roof claim cycle,” providing “instant access to accurate data that is automatically processed and securely stored for immediate use” to claims adjusters and other insurance professionals. Kespry has also announced that to continue extending its insurance capabilities, and “allow for easy integration with existing enterprise applications,” it is opening its architecture to third-party software providers. The company has established a foundation for providing APIs for integration with third parties, in an effort to build and grow its ecosystem, and this will also allow for bi-directional data sharing between Kespry and other enterprise systems. << Back to
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Tweet At the 2017 Paris Air Show, Textron Systems Unmanned Systems introduced its NIGHTWARDEN Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System (TUAS), which has a maximum speed of up to 90 knots, an endurance of up to 15 hours and a payload capacity of up to 130 pounds. With more than 400 hours of flight time under its belt for potential customers, including delegations from the Mideast, the Asia-Pacific region, and from Europe, the NIGHTWARDEN TUAS has undergone thorough internal testing and demonstration efforts.   The NIGHTWARDEN TUAS builds upon the lineage of TUAS that Textron Systems has developed, and according to the company, the NIGHTWARDEN is the “new next-generation platform, representing the production-ready model of the developmental Shadow® M2.”  “Since first announcing the Shadow M2, we’ve made significant improvements and enhancements to the system – so much in fact, that there are many differences between the two platforms,” says Bill Irby, Unmanned Systems Senior Vice President & General Manager . “For example, compared to our internal development model, the NIGHTWARDEN TUAS offers greater flexibility and combat capability, beyond-line-of-sight satellite communications (SATCOM) features, as well as enhanced command-and-control through Synturian™, Textron Systems’ new family of multi-domain control and collaboration technologies.”  By providing an optional SATCOM package, the NIGHTWARDEN TUAS has a capability common to bigger Group IV Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) platforms. The system also has significant operational flexibility, thanks to having a range of up to 1100 kilometers, and a “fly-from-home-or-hub” station capability. Thanks to its open architecture and dual-payload bay, additional capabilities for the system include sense-and-avoid equipment, communication relay, or additional payloads such as electronic attack, communications intelligence or signals intelligence. The Textron Systems Weapon & Sensor Systems precision guided glide munition, Fury, can also be installed, since further intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) payload capacity and strike capabilities can be installed. The NIGHTWARDEN TUAS typically uses an automated take-off and landing system, but it also “incorporates enhanced landing gear, remote taxi and an air vehicle parachute for emergency operations." By landing on unimproved surfaces, the NIGHTWARDEN TUAS has also demonstrated runway-independence. << Back to the News Photo Courtesy of Textron Systems << Back
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Tweet by AUVSI News   On June 15, the Douglas County Search and Rescue team in Colorado used a UAS to locate two missing hikers and a dog in the Pike National Forest, after they mistakenly left the Devil's Head trail. The hikers were able to call 9-1-1 with limited cell service, and the Douglas County Search and Rescue volunteer teams responded to the area. More than two dozen people responded, which included foot searchers, ATVs, a K-9 team, and the UAS team. About two hours after the teams responded to the area, the UAS team made visual contact with the lost hikers, and shortly after that, a search team on foot made contact with the hikers. According to Incident Commander Bruce Fosdick, the UAS saved hours of time in searching for the hikers. “Instead of an all-night search we were done in about 4 hours,” Fosdick says via Fox 31 Denver . Fosdick, a member of the search and rescue team since 1966, says that technology has come a long way since he became a member of the team, which has made a monumental difference in how search and rescue operations are conducted nowadays. “50 years ago basically everything was done by a group lined up in a straight line and just plodding through a field,” he says. “Now, scientifically we try to plot out a lot more where the subject is. We use a lot of different assets. Dogs, drones, helicopters. We try to do a lot more with a lot less people and try to get it done a lot quicker.” Roman Bukary, a member of the Douglas County Search and Rescue team, agrees with Fosdick in regards to the impact of this technology, and Bukary says that thanks to the technology, the June 15 operation went very smooth. “Everybody knew exactly where we were going what we were seeing who we had to deal with and how many we had to deal with and that made my life much easier,” Bukary says through CBS Denver. Made up entirely of volunteers, the Douglas County Search and Rescue team is funded mainly through donations, which allows it to conduct its missions free of charge. << Back to
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 19, 2017 Contact: Tom McMahon, tmcmahon@auvsi.org , (571) 255-7786 Automated Vehicles Symposium to Return to San Francisco, July 11 to 13 AUVSI and TRB to host gathering of automated vehicle professionals WASHINGTON — The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and the Transportation Research Board (TRB), part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, will host the fourth annual Automated Vehicles Symposium in San Francisco from July 11 to 13. The event, which will be held at the Hilton San Francisco Union Square, will bring together more than 1,500 representatives from academic institutions, government, and industry to exchange ideas and insights to expedite the future of automated vehicles. The symposium will build upon last year’s event, which included attendees from 28 countries and 46 states. Leading experts on technology challenges, policy development, and emerging issues will provide updates on state-of-the-art road vehicle automation research through plenary sessions, breakouts, exhibits, and networking opportunities. Discussion topics will include Public Transport and Shared Mobility, Deep Learning and Highly Automated Vehicles, Trucking Automation Technology Developments, and Making Automation Work for Cities. The plenary session, which will be held on July 11, will open with a keynote speech by Dr. Gill Pratt , CEO of the Toyota Research Institute. Dr. Pratt, a former program manager in the Defense Sciences Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, also known as DARPA, will discuss his vision for the future of automated vehicles. He will be joined by more than 40 plenary speakers discussing the industry’s latest technical advancements, key developments in urban mobility, automated trucking, planning and related subjects. Other speakers scheduled to address the symposium include: Andrey Berdichevskiy , Practice Lead Urban Mobility, World Economic Forum Malcolm Dougherty , Director, California Department of Transportation Dr. Aravind Kailas , Principal Technology Planner, Volvo Group North America Dr. Karl Iagnemma , CEO, nuTonomy Joseph Okpaku , VP, Government Relations, Lyft Seleta Reynolds , General Manager, Los Angeles Department of Transportation Andrew Salzberg , Head of Transportation Policy and Research, Uber Dr. Maarten Sierhuis , Director, Nissan Research Center More information on the symposium is available at www.automatedvehiclessymposium.org . Complimentary registration is provided to the media to cover the event. For more information, contact Zach Semple by email at zsemple@auvsi.org or by phone at 571-255-7798. # # # About AUVSI The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) — the world's largest nonprofit organization dedicated to the advancement of unmanned systems and robotics — represents more than 7,500 members from more than 60 countries involved in the fields of government, industry and academia. AUVSI members work in the defense, civil and commercial markets. About TRB TRB is one of seven program units of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, which provides independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conducts other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The Academies also encourage education and research, recognize ...
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Tweet Northrop Grumman has announced that using the high-speed AQS-24B sensor, the company has successfully demonstrated unmanned mine-hunting capabilities during the Belgian Defense Technology and Industry Day trials at the Naval Base at Zeebrugge, Belgium. The demonstration, which is a follow-on to a successful operation that took place in October 2016 during Unmanned Warrior in Scotland, showcased the high area coverage rate (ACR) that is attainable when combining Northrop Grumman’s AQS-24B mine hunting system with the Atlas Elektronik UK ARCIMS USV, a platform that has proven to be extremely stable, and shown that it is ideally suited for towing the high-speed AQS-24B in rough seas. “The ARCIMS - AQS-24B combination provides a highly effective and affordable mine countermeasure solution for our allies and theatre security partners,” says Alan Lytle, vice president, undersea systems, Northrop Grumman Mission Systems . Besides demonstrating the “modularity and ease of integration of the AQS-24B payload,” the exercise also showed “the importance of the laser line scan sensor which serves as a gap filler for the high speed synthetic aperture sonar.” “Our team’s demonstration at Belgium North Sea Unmanned MCM Trials proves that unmanned systems combined with the right payloads can perform high-speed mine countermeasures tasks, greatly reducing the mine clearance timeline while keeping naval personnel out of harm’s way,” Lytle adds. John Sutcliffe, director of business development at Atlas Elektronik UK, says, “Atlas Elektronik UK and Northrop Grumman are leading the way in demonstrating a capability that is real, mature and tested in relevant operational environments in the North Atlantic at the Royal Navy's unmanned warrior and now in the North Sea at the Belgian Navy's Zeebrugge sea areas.” As a defence contractor in the naval and maritime systems domain, Atlas Elektronik UK specializes in technologies in anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and mine countermeasure (MCM). They are also world leaders in several areas such as hydro acoustics, underwater communications and maritime security. << Back to the News Northrop Grumman Demonstrates Landmark Unmanned Mine-hunting Capabilities During Belgium North Sea Unmanned MCM Trials, Photo Courtesy of Northrop Grumman << Back
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 16, 2017 Contact: Tom McMahon, tmcmahon@auvsi.org , (571) 255-7786 UAS Organizations Raise Concern Over Jurisdiction of Nation’s Airspace Warn of “dramatic unintended consequences” if long-standing federal governance is changed WASHINGTON — The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and 13 other organizations have sent a letter to members of Congress urging them to consider the potential consequences for the unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) industry if legislation was enacted affecting the federal sovereignty of the airspace. The letter was signed by a diverse group of organizations, industries and companies that represent UAS manufacturers, commercial and recreational users, and aviation stakeholders. In the letter, the organizations say “legislation is premature and lawmakers should wait until efforts such as the [Federal Aviation Administration’s] Drone Advisory Committee (DAC) have created consensus recommendations – with input from stakeholders – before considering changes to long-standing federal governance of the [National Airspace System]. Legislating changes before consensus is reached may have dramatic unintended consequences that could stifle innovation, restrict economic growth and interstate commerce, and potentially compromise safety.” The industry representatives point out that “the FAA directed the DAC to ‘evaluate and analyze state or local government interests’ which ‘could form the basis for recommendations to the DAC reflecting a consensus view that could be used to inform future agency action related to the relative role of state and local governments in regulating aspects of low-altitude UAS operations.’ The tasking statement directs the group to issue a report on its findings in 2017.” The letter also states that “a consistent framework, agreed upon by all parties involved, is essential for the future regulatory system governing one of the fastest-growing areas in the aerospace and technology sectors. We appreciate your willingness to allow a multi-stakeholder process to proceed and prevent any legislation from moving forward that would jeopardize ongoing and collaborative efforts.” Legislation was recently introduced in the U.S. Senate that seeks to empower state and local authorities to regulate hobbyist and commercial UAS. Airspace jurisdiction is likely to be an issue when congressional committees start considering the FAA Reauthorization bill, which is expected later this month. An AUVSI economic report forecast that the expansion of UAS technology will create more than 100,000 jobs and generate more than $82 billion for the U.S. economy in the first decade following full integration of UAS into the nation’s airspace. The letter may be found here . # # # About AUVSI The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) — the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of unmanned systems and robotics — represents more than 7,500 members from more than 60 countries involved in the fields of government, industry and academia. AUVSI members work in the defense, civil and commercial markets. For more information, visit
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Tweet by AUVSI News   After being awarded a $24 million contract, Angelo Iafrate Construction, which is a Michigan-based company that has experience in heavy civil and transportation construction, will oversee phase one of the construction of a connected and automated vehicle proving ground at Willow Run for the American Center for Mobility. The first phase of construction, which is expected to be complete and open for testing in December of this year, will include the building of a two-and-a-half-mile highway loop with on- and off-ramps and a 700’ curved tunnel. A garage for customers will also be constructed, and an operations center will be built out. “We’ve been rapidly crafting this world-class purpose-built facility, with careful consideration of critical features and fidelity to real-world driving conditions,” says John Maddox, president and CEO of the Center . “We feel the Angelo Iafrate Construction Company has the real-world expertise and proven capability necessary to handle a project of this magnitude.” Mike DeFinis, vice president of Angelo Iafrate Construction, says, “Angelo Iafrate Construction Company is proud to be selected as the contractor of choice for this unique project at the American Center for Mobility and the integral role we will play in its development and construction.” “We have built our reputation on excellence, innovation, collaboration, and quality construction, and we look forward to the opportunity to construct this state-of-the-art automated and connected vehicle test facility.” The Center will be located on more than 500 acres in Ypsilanti Township, and will give occupants the opportunity to test, develop and validate connected and automated technologies. Those that work at the center will also be able to “accelerate the development of voluntary industry standards, workforce and public education,” according to the American Center for Mobility. << Back to
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Weekend Roundup

Tweet by AUVSI News   This Week in the Unmanned Systems and Robotics World Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper has signed a bill that mandates the creation of a study on how UAS can help public safety agencies with their missions, and in turn, lower their dependence on manned aircraft. Through H.B.1070, a UAS pilot program will be established, and the Department of Labor and Employment will receive authorization “to provide resources for the training and development of eligible pilot program members.” The results of the program (which will be funded through gifts, grants and donations) and the study will be submitted to General Assembly committees. ( Unmanned Aerial ) As a part of NASA’s Convergent Aeronautics Solutions (CAS) project, three teams of researchers will each begin separate formal feasibility studies related in UAS. It is expected to take between 24-30 months to complete the three investigations. A team of NASA aeronautics managers selected the studies, and the studies join five that were selected last year, and six that were selected the year before. ( Vision Systems ) The China Electronics Technology Group Corporation (CETC) says that China has broken the previous record of a swarm of 67 drones, by launching a swarm of 119 fixed-wing UAS. While in the air, the UAS performed catapult-assisted take-offs and formations. The CETC says that “swarm intelligence” is the core of artificial intelligence of unmanned systems, and the future of intelligent unmanned systems. ( Shanghai Daily ) Beijing's first driverless subway line, the Yanfang line, has started test runs, and has an anticipated service start timeframe of the end of 2017. According to the entity responsible for the construction of the line, First Engineering Co., Ltd of China Railway Electrification Bureau Group, the Yanfang line will be the first domestically developed automated subway on the mainland. The maximum speed on the line will be 80 kilometers per hour, and the trains will be able to carry 1,262 passengers. ( Xinhuanet.com ) The FAA has granted Praxis Aerospace Concepts International (PACI) authorization to operate UAS within Las Vegas’ Class B airspace, allowing the company to provide UAS services to the cities of Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas. PACI is a service-disabled, veteran-owned small business, whose mission is to “develop practical solutions for multi-modal (ground-air-sea-industrial) response robotics and unmanned systems.” PACI has already received permission to operate UAS at night time, and it plans on seeking additional waivers under the Part 107 rule. ( Unmanned Aerial ) << Back to
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Tweet For Immediate Release : June 16, 2017 Contact : Tom McMahon, tmcmahon@auvsi.org, (571) 255-7786 UAS Organizations Raise Concern Over Jurisdiction of Nation’s Airspace Warn of “dramatic unintended consequences” if long-standing federal governance is changed WASHINGTON — The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) along with 13 other organizations today sent a letter to members of Congress urging them to consider the potential consequences for the unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) industry if the legislation was enacted affecting the federal sovereignty of the airspace. The letter was signed by a diverse group of organizations, industries and companies that represent UAS manufacturers, commercial and recreational users, and aviation stakeholders. In the letter, the organizations say “legislation is premature and lawmakers should wait until efforts such as the [Federal Aviation Administration’s] Drone Advisory Committee (DAC) have created consensus recommendations – with input from stakeholders – before considering changes to long-standing federal governance of the [National Airspace System]. Legislating changes before consensus is reached may have dramatic unintended consequences that could stifle innovation, restrict economic growth and interstate commerce, and potentially compromise safety.”    The industry representatives point out that “the FAA directed the DAC to ‘evaluate and analyze state or local government interests’ which ‘could form the basis for recommendations to the DAC reflecting a consensus view that could be used to inform future agency action related to the relative role of state and local governments in regulating aspects of low-altitude UAS operations.’ The tasking statement directs the group to issue a report on its findings in 2017.” The letter also states that “a consistent framework, agreed upon by all parties involved, is essential for the future regulatory system governing one of the fastest-growing areas in the aerospace and technology sectors. We appreciate your willingness to allow a multi-stakeholder process to proceed and prevent any legislation from moving forward that would jeopardize ongoing and collaborative efforts.” Legislation was recently introduced in the U.S. Senate that seeks to empower state and local authorities to regulate hobbyist and commercial UAS. Airspace jurisdiction is likely to be an issue when congressional committees start considering the FAA Reauthorization bill, which is expected later this month. An AUVSI economic report forecast that the expansion of UAS technology will create more than 100,000 jobs and generate more than $82 billion for the U.S. economy in the first decade following full integration of UAS into the nation’s airspace. The letter may be found  here . About AUVSI The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) — the world's largest non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of unmanned systems and robotics — represents more than 7,500 members from more than 60 countries involved in the fields of government, industry and academia. AUVSI members work in the defense, civil and commercial markets. For more information, visit AUVSI.org . << Back to the News << Back
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