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Weekend Roundup

Tweet This Week in the Unmanned Systems and Robotics World Japan’s ANA Crown Plaza Narita and Narita International Airport will be utilizing the help of the HOSPI(R) Autonomous Delivery Robot this month. The robot, designed by the Panasonic Corporation, is equipped with a preprogrammed map, a variety of sensors, and an advanced collision-avoidance algorithm that helps it navigate its environment without bumping into people or things. During its time at the Crown Plaza, the HOSPI(R) offered water bottles to guests and announced the times for bus departures. At the Narita International Airport's "Narita Travel Lounge," from January 23 to 27, the HOSPI(R) will be used to collect dirty dishes and take them to the counter for washing. Video footage of the robot in action can be seen here . ( New Atlas ) A fourteen-year-old from Gujarat, India has developed a drone that is capable of disabling landmines in the battlefield. The drone was developed by Harshwardhan Zala, who was inspired to make the system after seeing soldiers getting hurt in the battlefield while they were trying to manually defuse landmines. After developing two prototypes with funding help from his parents, Zala has been granted a contract worth $730,000 to produce more of the drones that can be used in the battlefield. The drones are equipped with a 50-gram explosive, which safely destroys the landmines. ( Small UAS News ) In India, the Mumbai Metropolitan Region Development Authority (MMRDA) has plans to use UAS to help with the construction of future metro rail corridors in the city. The UAS will be used to conduct aerial surveys for the building of the DN Nagar-Bandra-Mankhurd (Metro 2B) route, and the Wadala-Ghatkopar-Thane-Kasarvadavali (Metro 4) route. The data collected from the UAS, along with data collected from surveys conducted on land, will be stored for future planning. ( The Indian Express ) New Zealand has begun to use UAS to monitor White Island, the country’s most active volcano. According to Brad Scott, a volcanologist at New Zealand’s Crown Research Institute GNS Science, using UAS, GNS Science has been able to access the active crater area at White Island, and obtain images of the area that were previously blocked by steam and gas. ( NZResources.com ) The Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) has launched the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Challenge for 2017. The challenge, open to students in the United Kingdom, as well as overseas, will give students the opportunity to design and build their own UAS, and eventually test them against their fellow competitors in a competition to transport a package as accurately and quickly as possible. ( Eureka ) The director general of civil aviation (DGCA), ministry of home affairs (MoHA) and ministry of defence (MoD) have granted 13 tiger reserves in India permission to use UAS for monitoring. The UAS will be used as a part of the 'E-Bird technology for tiger conservation: Development and integration of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)' project. The UAS will be used to provide better protection and conservation for both tigers and their prey base. ( Times of India ) << Back to the News Photo Courtesy of Panasonic << Back to the News
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Tweet << Back to the News Steve Fendley will hold the corporate senior vice president and president of Kratos’ Unmanned Systems Division (KUSD), the company announced. Fendley will step into the position when Jerry Beaman retires. Beaman has held the position since 2014. Last year, Kratos receive many unmanned combat aircraft systems contract awards under his leadership, Kratos said. Beaman also helped strengthen the partnership between KUSD and the U.S. military. “Our unmanned systems programs would not be where they are today without Jerry’s leadership, experience, and vision and I can’t thank Jerry enough for the over three years he has dedicated to Kratos. I wish him the best in retirement and look forward to continuing to work with him as a consultant of the company,” says president and CEO of Kratos, Eric DeMarco. After retiring, Beaman plans to continue to support the company as a consultant. Fendley will be responsible for Kratos’ tactical UCAS business, unmanned aerial target drone, unmanned ground, unmanned seaborne systems, and KUSD’s related avionics, electronics and command and control business. Rear Adm. Dennis FitzPatrick, retired from the U.S. Navy, will support Fendley in his new position. FitzPatrick became an employee of Kratos in 2014 where he held the role of vice president of tactical platforms operations. Fendley’s entire career has been based on unmanned and optionally-piloted aircraft and aerial systems, Kratos said. His defense industry roles for multiple defense contractors have spanned from electrical/systems engineering, to engineering management, program management, and executive management.
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Tweet by AUVSI News Entities from Pennsylvania, Ohio and Michigan have agreed to work together as a part of a ‘Smart Belt Coalition’ (SBC), dedicated to advancing initiatives surrounding driverless and connected vehicles. In the coming months, the SBC, which will include transportation agencies and universities from each state, will be formalized with a memorandum of understanding (MOU). The Coalition was formed to accomplish a variety of goals, including establishing a network of transportation innovations for connected automation, validating different innovations across a variety of urban and rural roadways, and sharing data that will go towards the research and development of future technologies. According to Michigan State Transportation Director Kirk T. Steudle, this partnership between the three states is especially important as the world of mobility continues to change every day. “This initiative highlights the collaboration we know will be necessary as mobility evolves at an exponential pace,” Steudle says through Michigan's Department of Transportation website . “Working closely with our colleagues in neighboring states will pay dividends for all of us while we continue to leverage our existing partnerships with universities and the American Center for Mobility.” The three states were reportedly chosen because they all have a lot in common, including similar climates, commercial truck traffic, and they all are actively working in the world of driverless and connected vehicles. For Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Secretary Leslie S. Richards, this Coalition has room for plenty of opportunities. “I’m excited for us to continue our efforts in fostering safe and effective development of this technology,” Richards says via the Central Penn Business Journal . “This multi-state partnership not only offers fantastic collaboration opportunities, but will also bring some consistency to testing scenarios that will help the private sector as they develop these technologies.” Right now, the SBC is working on a strategic plan that focuses on several areas of importance, including connected and automated applications in work zones, commercial freight opportunities in testing, and incident management applications capable of providing better information for emergency responders and other agencies. << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News Unmanned aircraft may provide advantages when it comes to gathering data about grassland ecosystems, according to a recent study conducted in the Hulunber grasslands of northeast China. Grasslands cover about 27 percent of the Earth’s surface, providing forage for livestock, storing carbon and protecting soil. Chinese researchers funded by the National Science Foundation of China, China Agricultural Research System, and others, conducted a study to see if unmanned aircraft could provide an alternative to field-based data collection for attributes such as grassland canopy height, ground cover and biomass. The researchers concluded that a UAS carrying a light detection and ranging, or lidar, system could “yield vital returns” for these purposes, and do so on a large scale. However, they decided that further testing should be conducted. The investigators used a lightweight Velodyne HDL-32E lidar mounted on a UAS to gather data that was necessary to estimate the grassland canopy height, fractional cover, and biomass, and was able to provide a substitute to field-based date collection. Lidar data is primarily used in the grassland to retrieve information and is said to be the best for calculating canopy height and fractional cover data. Space borne lidar data gives the highest level of spatial coverage and lowers economic costs over the large tested areas. Terrestrial or airborne lidar is usually too pricey to use for a broad-scale data collection. On the other hand, the photogrammetric data method is low in cost compared to lidar, but fails to estimate grassland canopy heights. The lidar sensor was limited by the larger laser beam being used in the test. Future studies will be held to determine the benefits of lidar systems with a short transmit pulse widths and a smaller laser beam in the calculation of grassland parameters. << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News The Mississippi Community College Board has awarded Pearl River Community College (PRCC), located in Poplarville, Mississippi, with the Career and Technical Education Challenge Grant, worth $215,250. PRCC will use the grant to create a UAS program. To create the program, PRCC is working with the Tyonek Services Overhaul Facility at the Stennis International Airport in Kiln, Mississippi. When speaking about the program, Tyonek site director Dean Oden explains what the students in the program will learn so that they can be integrated into the growing industry of unmanned aerial systems. “We need a workforce to cover what we do,” Oden says via the Hattiesburg American . “They will be working their way to the FAA Part 107 operator’s license. They will learn how to operate and maintain the UAS platform.” According to Scott Alsobrooks, the vice president for workforce and economic development at PRCC, classes are expected to start in August. They will be taught at the college’s Hancock Center in Waveland, Mississippi. Through the program, students will receive a two-year associate’s degree in applied science. << Back to the News
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Tweet A rail transport company named Alstom has invested €14 million Euros, or just under $15 million in American dollars, in a startup company called EasyMile, which has developed the EZ10 electric driverless shuttle. Besides Alstom providing an investment that will form part of EasyMile’s ongoing capital increase, the two companies have also agreed to partner to create products for urban transportation. “Through this investment, Alstom expands its knowledge into the driverless technologies and pursues its development in the growing field of smart mobility,” says Bruno Marguet, Head of Strategy at Alstom, through press release . “We are confident in the success of the EZ10, already tested in different climates and conditions.” Designed to provide transportation for the final mile of a trip, the EZ10 operates from a transport hub to a final destination within a precinct or confined area. Since April 2015, the EZ10, which can hold up to 12 people, has been operational at more than 50 sites in 14 countries in Asia, North America, the Middle East and Europe. << Back to the News Photo Courtesy of EasyMile << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News Williamson County Schools in Tennessee are partnering with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to develop a program dedicated to autonomous vehicles. The program, which will initially start at Independence High School and Franklin High School this fall, will teach students the Python programming language, the Ubuntu operating system, and the robot operating system (ROS). The programming language and operating systems will be used to program the students' vehicles to operate autonomously as they maneuver through a course. When speaking about what led to the creation of the program, Brent Greene, an AP computer science teacher at Franklin High School, spoke about his desire to give students real world applications of the things that they learn in the classroom. “The teaching of computer science/programming as just a set of languages, does not appeal to me, as it seems very removed from any application to real life,” Greene says via the Tennessean . Greene, who pitched the program and helped start it, adds, “I wanted to create a program that was cutting edge and would be for years to come.” According to the Tennessean, the ideal course sequence would see freshmen take a class called Coding I, sophomores taking Autonomous Vehicles I, juniors taking Autonomous Vehicles II, and seniors taking AP Computer Science. During sophomore and junior years, students are going to be responsible for writing their own code, and building their own 1/10th scale automobile. Students will finish the program by putting their vehicles on a course and letting it drive autonomously. << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News Amazon has been granted a patent for a roadway management system that is capable of communicating with autonomous vehicles, and helping them navigate their respective driving lanes based on a variety of outside factors. Amazon will seek do this by connecting the system with transportation data, and enabling the system to communicate with driverless vehicles through an existing network. From Business Insider , a filing from the patent says, “the roadway management system can determine the direction of travel for lanes in a roadway and direct autonomous automobiles to enter the roadway in a particular lane." The system would be especially valuable in areas like Seattle, where Amazon is headquartered, as it could help driverless vehicles navigate roads and highways with reversible lanes. Reversible lanes are utilized to ensure the smoothest flow of traffic, specifically during rush hour. This is Amazon's latest dive into the world of unmanned systems. The company has already invested heavily in unmanned aerial systems, and even started making deliveries via UAS in England in December 2016. << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News Airbus’ Zephyr-S program, also known as the High Altitude Pseudo Satellite (HAPS), has tapped United Kingdom-based Osprey Consulting Services to help with safety and regulations. “This is an exciting project for Osprey, and exactly what we enjoy doing. Zephyr launches in a similar way to powered aircraft, has the performance characteristics of a sailplane, can operate globally but endures like a satellite — as such it challenges many aspects of conventional aviation concepts and thinking,” says Richard Connelly, Osprey’s Director Strategy and Capability Development. Osprey will work to make sure the new HAPS can operate in international airspace, without any issues. Connelly says, “Imaginative and innovative approaches are required to address unique regulatory, safety and airspace challenges. Osprey’s extensive understanding of international unmanned aircraft systems and airspace regulations, combined with our award-winning approach to delivering innovative safety solutions, makes us an ideal partner to support Airbus in developing this incredible platform.” Zephyr-S will be solar powered and responsible for collecting data over larger areas and with more detail than any other UAS before. The plan is to offer this new UAS a substitution to the more expensive, traditional satellite option << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News The Federal Aviation Administration and SkyPan International Inc. have finally reached a settlement regarding a fine that was issued in 2015. SkyPan Inc. was originally fined $1.9 million by the Federal Aviation Administration for allegedly operating UAS in a crowded airspace in major cities (New York City and Chicago). The settlement states the SkyPan will work with the FAA to help support its public outreach campaign. SkyPan will also pay $200,000 to the FAA, along with a $150,000 yearly fine if the company violates any further regulations. “SkyPan’s flights were conducted two years before the FAA’s first rule for commercial UAS operations, commonly referred to as Part 107, went into effect in August 2016, and all but a few were conducted before the FAA began to issue exemptions to authorize commercial UAS operations in September 2014 under the Section 333 process,” the company said in a press release. “SkyPan has never had an accident, and SkyPan has never compromised citizens’ privacy or security. SkyPan obtained a section 333 Exemption in 2015.” The company said it wanted to settle “to resolve this matter without any further expense or delay of business.” << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News TomTom, a leading provider of navigation and mapping products, has announced that it has acquired an autonomous driving startup company based in Berlin called Autonomos. Founded in 2012, Autonomos has created its own self-driving software, and the company has also aided automated vehicle assistance systems with its own Research & Development consultancy services. “We are proud to have been selected by the world leader in map making for bringing autonomous driving together to the next level,” says Autonomos CEO and co-founder Tinosch Ganjineh in a TomTom press release . “TomTom's technology combined with our intelligent driving know-how are a perfect match to make the dream of self-driving cars become a reality.” Before launching Autonomos, the company’s founders had several years’ worth of experience working at the Free University of Berlin on research projects surrounding autonomous driving. Now that it has been acquired by TomTom, Autonomos will provide in house assistance to TomTom on some of its products including its HD map, RoadDNA localization technology, and navigation, traffic and other cloud services. “This is an important development for TomTom as it will help us to continue to strengthen our capabilities for the future of driving and expand our knowledge and expertise,” says TomTom CEO and co-founder Harold Goddijn. “With this deal we are further positioning ourselves as one of the leaders in autonomous driving.” << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News The U.S. Navy’s Sea Hunter Unmanned Surface Vehicle (USV) is set to receive several upgrades that will allow it to carry out new missions involving surface warfare, the firing of weapons and launching electronic attacks. According to Capt. Jon Rucker, program manager, Unmanned Maritime Systems, PEO LCS, the upgrades that will be made to the Sea Hunter are exciting, but they are just the beginning for the USV. “Right now, the sky is the limit, but, before we even get to that, we need to be able to have a more autonomous system that can steer and reposition itself,” Rucker says via Defense Systems . While the USV is not fully autonomous yet, as it still needs a human operator to intervene on certain tasks, Rucker is hopeful that the USV will one day be fully autonomous, as he says, “it will have an ability to work with the surface force, do command and control and go investigate.” Described as the Navy’s equivalent to Google’s self-driving car, the 132-foot long Sea Hunter is capable of withstanding waves up to 6.5 feet, and can also travel up 10,000 miles to locate mines and quiet enemy submarines using sonar and other sensors. << Back to the News
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Tweet Intel has announced its plans to create a Responsive Retail Platform (Intel RRP), which is meant to, among many things, personalize a person’s experience while they are shopping inside of a store. The platform will also speed up the process for inventory tracking, and give employees of a store access to information such as buying habits of shoppers. To accomplish its goals, Intel will invest $100 million in the retail industry over the next five years to integrate its platform into stores. The platform, according to Intel President Brian Krzanich, will be the company’s response to a lack of data, as it is more difficult presently to track information from in store shopping experiences compared to online shopping. “Until now, detailed shopper data was only available to online storefronts,” Krzanich says in a company blog post . “At Intel, we believe that increasingly retailers will be separated by those who have data and use it to grow and optimize the shopping experience, and those who don’t and make their decisions based on “experience” and subjective observations.” While Intel does not have a concrete platform available as of yet to carry out its objective, Krzanich believes that Simbe Robotics’ Tally platform could be the answer. The Tally, which is the world’s first autonomous platform for shelf auditing and analytics specifically for retail, provides retail workers with up to date information on a store's products to make sure that they are always stocked, in the correct place and have the proper price tag. During NRF’s “Retail Big Show,” Krzanich showcased the Tally, which is powered by an Intel Core i7 processor-based Intel NUC, and is also equipped with several Intel RealSense cameras to help it see and move around the store. << Back to the News << Back to the News
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Tweet Riptide Autonomous Solutions has produced a new micro unmanned underwater vehicle, designed for developers of autonomy, behaviors, power systems, subsea sensors, and new payloads. The base price of under $15,000 allows any operation to any undersea survey or science organization, the company says. The new micro-UUV model features sonar payloads, acoustic communications, 360 degree cameras and the capability for custom end-user applications. “During 2016 Riptide built over two dozen systems and delivered units to multiple military, academic and commercial customers. We built up a solid backlog of vehicle orders as well as added multiple new development program wins,” says Jeff Smith, president Riptide. Open software and hardware contributed to the production of the micro-UUV, which allowed a a rapid mix of new payloads. This helped bring about flooded payload sections for custom end-user applications on the micro-UUV model. The micro-UUV will be unveiled at OINA 2017. Riptide will be located on stand A58. “We look forward to sharing our latest product configurations with OINA visitors in San Diego and will be prepared to discuss new application areas and customer requirements on site, as well as what’s next for Riptide,” Smith says. << Back to the News << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department announced in a press conference on Thursday that it will begin using an unmanned aircraft for special operations. Sheriff Jim McDonnell received approval from the Federal Aviation Administration to use the UAS in certain tactical operations such as search and rescue, explosive ordinance detection, hazardous materials incidents, disaster response, hostage rescue, arson fires, and barricaded and armed suspects. The UAS will be used by the Special Enforcement Bureau and will help support the Emergency Services Detail, Special Enforcement Detail, Arson/Explosives Detail, and the HazMat Detail. “The dangers of law enforcement can never be eliminated,” said Los Angeles County Sheriff Jim McDonnell. “However, this technology can assist us in reducing the impact of risks on personnel and allow us to perform operations to enhance public safety.” << Back to the News
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Tweet For the first time, autonomous vehicles will be tested on public, trafficked roads in Europe next month, as self-driving Nissan models hit the crowded streets of London. Nissan has developed these new LEAF model vehicles that have a new technology that allows them to drive on roads without changing lanes. The U.K. government seems to be fully invested in the new technology, planning to be the leading location for research and development and the manufacturing of such vehicles by 2025. “We want to see centers, like Nissan’s here in Cranfield, continue to develop, making us a world leader in the development and testing of auto technology so we can anchor the next generation of vehicle manufacturing and its supply chain here in the UK,” says Greg Clark U.K. secretary of state for business, energy and industrial strategy. Along with Nissan, Ford, Jaguar and Land Rover are preparing their autonomous technology in the U.K. The model by Nissan is expected to be on the market in 2020. Sources Here: https://eandt.theiet.org/content/articles/2017/01/nissan-to-start-testing-driverless-cars-in-london-next-month/ http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/nissan-is-testing-autonomous-cars-on-london-roads-next-month_uk_5878de1be4b0f3b82a377bef << Back to the News << Back to the News
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Tweet In order to meet the objectives of the 2014-2019 Military Planning Act, the French Defence Procurement Agency (DGA) has ordered a fourth MQ-9 Reaper UAS. Built by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, the medium altitude, long-endurance system is expected to be delivered to the French Ministry of Defence by 2019. “MALE drones are essential tools in modern conflict zones, offering a major capability in terms of knowledge and anticipation,” DGA says, via Defense News . “They are capable of missions of intelligence gathering, surveillance, reconnaissance and target designation while operating, thanks to their endurance, over large areas, long distance and long periods.” So far, two Reaper UAS have been delivered to France, with a third expected to soon be delivered to the Cognac air base. Upon its arrival, the air force and DGA will test the system to validate its air-transportability onboard French transport aircraft, as well as its technical conditions while operating in the electromagnetic environment of the air base. Some of the features of the Reaper UAS include an endurance of more than 27 hours, operational heights of up to 50,000 feet, and the ability to carry a variety of mission payloads including electro-optical/infrared, multi-mode maritime surveillance radar and a variety of weapons packages. The third Reaper UAS will be used to train members of the 1/33 Belfort squadron. << Back to the News Photo Courtesy of General Atomics << Back to the News
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Tweet Plymouth University in the United Kingdom plans to launch an autonomous ship across the Atlantic Ocean in 2020. The vessel is set to mimic the Mayflower’s path and mark the 400th anniversary of the original voyage, sailing from Plymouth, England to Plymouth, Massachusetts. The university has partnered with MSubs and Shuttleworth Design to create the trimaran autonomous ship, dubbed the Mayflower Autonomous Ship. It will be more than 100 feet in length and fueled by renewable energy while using traditional sails. Shuttleworth Design is responsible for designing the vessel. A trimaran model was chosen since it is said to be best for low-speed travel. The Mayflower Autonomous Ship is also equipped to hold and deploy autonomous underwater vehicles, so that other data may be recorded during this journey. “MAS has the potential to be a genuine world first, and will operate as a research platform, conducting numerous scientific experiments during its voyage,” says Prof. Kevin Jones, executive dean of the faculty of science and engineering at Plymouth University. “And it will be a test bed for new navigation software and alternative forms of power, incorporating huge advancements in solar, wave and sail technology. As the eyes of the world follow its progress, it will provide a live educational resource to students — a chance to watch, and maybe participate in history in the making." Wave-tank testing of scale models will be the first step. Complete construction is set to begin in 2017. Trials will begin in 2019, and once completed the MAS would begin its journey. Initial funding is coming from the university, MSubs and the ProMare Foundation, but additional corporate and private sponsorships are being sought. According to those within the project the ocean journey could be as short as 10 days, if weather permits, or as long as 10 months if researchers want to take their time. << Back to the News << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News Liteye Systems and Tribalco have announced that they will partner to provide the U.S. military with multiple AUDS counter-UAS defense systems. As a part of the partnership, Tribalco will help with infield installation and training support of Liteye’s AUDS systems, which are designed to detect, track, identify, and ultimately defeat opposing UAS, from both the air and the ground. “Tribalco has been working with Liteye since the inception of AUDS, and through our partnership, we have worked diligently to provide certified AUDS installers and trainers to meet the immediate mission requirements of U.S. Forces,” says Zac Neumayr, Vice President, Tribalco, through a company press release . The AUDS system has several features which make it capable of thwarting hostile UAS. It is equipped with state-of-the-art radar, precision thermal and daylight cameras, as well as advanced video tracking, and non-kinetic defeat capabilities. Besides those features, the AUDS is also equipped with a smart sensor and effector package, which allows it to detect smaller UAS. President of Liteye Systems Thomas Scott says, “as the legitimate use of unmanned vehicles becomes more prevalent in many industries, they become readily available for illicit use by our enemies. With the right technologies, we can provide coverage to our warfighters, while they conduct their mission of protecting against those who wish them harm.” << Back to the News
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Weekend Roundup

Tweet This Week in the Unmanned Systems and Robotics World Volkswagen has unveiled its ID Buzz concept van, which is fully electric. Based primarily off of the company’s Type-2 Microbus, the vehicle has a top speed of 99 miles per hour, and can travel an estimated 270 miles (based on American driving habits and testing methods) thanks to the energy stored in its battery pack that hides beneath its wood floor. With a fully customizable inside, all of the vehicle’s seats can be removed, or several of them can be combined to create beds or loungers. The ID Buzz is intended to have both autonomous driving and human piloted modes. Volkswagen would like to release the vehicle between 2022 and 2025. ( CNET ) China has unveiled its first human-like robot named Jia Jia. Developed by engineers at the University of Science and Technology of China, Jia Jia can answer simple questions, has natural eye movement and when she speaks, her lips move in sync with her words. Chen Xiaoping, team leader of the engineers from the University of Science and Technology of China, believes that Jia Jia can one day be used to work in a variety of places such as restaurants, nursing homes and hospitals. ( The Economic Times ) The Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (TTFRI) has unveiled its small UAS that it will use for its typhoon research program. Equipped with specialized sensors that help detect temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind speed and direction, each UAS has a flight time between 10-18 hours, and will have the ability to be used with several types of payloads, including electro-optic/infrared, high-definition survey, and mapping and meteorology equipment. ( Focus Taiwan News Channel ) Volvo has launched a research project called Drive Me, that will give ordinary people the opportunity to test drive autonomous vehicles in Gothenburg, Sweden. The first participants of the project received their autonomous Volvo XC90 on Monday, January 9. The project will seek to examine the technological, infrastructural and societal conditions of the autonomous technology as they work in concert together. ( Business Insider Nordic ) Baidu and BAIC Motor are working together to create a driverless vehicle capable of level 3 autonomous driving. Level 3 autonomous driving requires humans to be present, but they only need to intervene on certain occasions. Baidu hopes to have vehicles with these capabilities ready for road testing by the end of this year. ( Tech Crunch ) A team of around 20 engineers from Seoul National University in South Korea has developed a driverless vehicle that is currently being used on its campus, but the vehicle will soon be available to test on roads, thanks to the Korean government passing legislation last year that will open downtown roads for driverless vehicle testing. The team hopes to make the car capable of level 4 autonomous driving, which means the vehicle will be fully autonomous. ( Mashable ) << Back to the News Photo Courtesy of Volkswagen << Back to the News
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