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Weekend Roundup

This Week in the Unmanned Systems and Robotics World The U.S. Army is working on developing autonomous vehicles to use for transporting injured soldiers to and from doctor’s appointments. The Army hopes these vehicles can help with the development of autonomous vehicles to use on the battlefield. ( Foxtrot Alpha ) One man recently used his old Game Boy classic to control a UAS during its flight. The UAS he was operating was a AR.Drone 2.0 from Parrot. ( Trusted Reviews ) A Chinese UUV, named "Haidou-1," has set the record for deepest dive. It went 10,767 meters, or almost seven miles, deep to the ocean’s lowest point, the Mariana Trench in the West Pacific. ( NDTV ) Roborace has created an autonomous race car called the DevBot, which can reach speeds of up to 180 mph. ( Auto Express ) Northrop Grumman has donated a Bat UAS to the Northland Community and Technical College's unmanned aircraft systems programs. The Bat is a medium-sized UAS that can fly 18 hours at a time and reach altitudes of 17,000 feet. ( Grand Forks Herald ) A New Zealand Domino’s pizza chain completed a delivery by UAS. Domino’s wants to launch a full time delivery service by UAS before the end of the year. ( Yahoo ) Researchers at Harvard have created an autonomous robot modeled after an Octopus. The Octobot, known as the world’s first soft autonomous robot, has one purpose: dancing. ( Laughing Squid ) << Back to the News
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The inaugural class at GA-ASI’s UAS Flight Training Academy graduated on August 12, the company said Thursday. After opening in June, the Academy’s first class included three pilots. GA-ASI boasts a quick turnaround time for training aircrews for piloting and operating the company’s UAS Predator series. The training provided by the academy includes 15 flights (36 hours), 25 simulator lessons (59 hours), and 114 hours of academic studies. “Our first graduates have benefitted from safe, effective, cutting-edge training that will enable them to support flight operations for our global customers,” said David R. Alexander, President of Aircraft Systems at GA-ASI. “We look forward to providing the same high-quality training services to our customers’ aircrews to meet their growing demands in the very near future.” While graduates of the first class are qualified to be aircrew for the Predator A, the plan is to incorporate curriculum so that graduates can be aircrew for the Predator B as well. GA-ASI’s next class is expected to include five additional pilots and six sensor operators. Graduates from the academy will join more than 200 qualified GA-ASI aircrews across the world. << Back to the News
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The Federal Aviation Administration’s Earl Lawrence, director of the agency’s UAS Integration Office, said in an AUVSI-hosted webinar on Thursday that the agency is bracing for a flood of interest in the new small UAS rule, which takes effect on Monday. More than 3,300 people have already registered to take the written test on the first day, highlighting what webinar host Brian Wynne, president and CEO of AUVSI, said is interest in the “long awaited” rule that will allow some commercial operations without burdensome requirements, such as a pilot’s license. “This is truly one of the first operational rules for the routine use of UAS,” Lawrence said. “And I want to stress that we are now transitioning to the routine operation of UAS.” While there are still strict limits: No flying beyond line of sight, no flying above 400 feet, no night flights, many of these can be circumvented with the agency’s new waiver process, which will also be active on Aug. 29. The agency will actually start issuing waivers on the first day, based on requests that have come in through the existing Section 333 process. That process will continue, but only for flight operations that won’t fit under the Part 107, or small UAS rule, or under the waiver process. Two of the most popular requests are for flights over people and flights at night. Lawrence said some existing Section 333 exemptions already allow this, and interested parties should look at those for guidance on how to meet the requirements, or wait until some of the first waivers have been posted and study them. Lawrence said the first step for anyone having questions is to call the new help line, 1-844-FLY-MY-UA, which will be staffed with “live people” to answer questions during business hours. Information is also available on the FAA’s www.faa.gov/UAS page, which will be revamped with a new waiver portal on Monday. The Section 333 exemption process sometimes took months for final approval; Lawrence said the waiver process is different and should be much faster. “We didn’t have waivers before, that was an exemption process. An exemption process has different rules under the law which must be followed,” he said, such as obtaining public comments. “A waiver is something in complete control of the agency.” However, he said if the FAA gets 200,000 waiver applications on Monday morning, “it may take us a little while to get through that.” He said it should be noted that the FAA has just opened up “an awful lot of airspace, a lot of opportunities under visual line of sight … but we realize we’re just getting started.” Listen to the webinar here. (Members-only) << Back to the News
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Driverless taxis debuted Thursday in Singapore, thanks to a startup company called nuTonomy. The taxis are being tested with several dozen people around the city, and the data collected from the trial will provide better information for nuTonomy as they hope to launch their service full time in just two years. “This feedback will give nuTonomy a unique advantage as we work toward deployment of a self-driving vehicle fleet in 2018,” said nuTonomy chief executive and co-founder Karl Iagnemma, in an article published by the Bangkok Post . “The trial represents an extraordinary opportunity to collect feedback from riders in a real-world setting.” The people participating in the trial runs of the taxis have been invited to participate by nuTonomy, and can order the service via their smartphone, similar to Uber and Lyft rides. Right now in the testing phase, there are six taxis (with the goal of expanding to 12 by the end of the year) on the road operating in a 2.5 square mile area. The taxis, which are modified Renault Zoe and Mitsubishi i-MiEV electrics, are equipped with six sets of lidar and two cameras. While the drives are autonomous, the vehicles include a company engineer who monitors the drive and is on standby in case of emergency. If everything goes according to plan, then the service provided by nuTonomy could cut the number of cars on the road from 900,000 to 600,000, according to nuTonomy's Chief Operating Officer Doug Parker. Parker envisions a world of endless possibilities if his estimates are correct. “When you are able to take that many cars off the road, it creates a lot of possibilities,” said Parker via the Associated Press . “You can create smaller roads, you can create much smaller car parks. I think it will change how people interact with the city going forward.” << Back to the News
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On Wednesday, North Carolina-based UAS and software company PrecisionHawk and Oregon-based drone operations management company Skyward announced a new partnership, which they said would give customers a one-stop shop to plan, map, manage and analyze their work with drones. As a part of their partnership, PrecisionHawk’s Lancaster UAS, DJI Smarter Farming package and DataMapper function will be equipped with Skyward’s flight operations system. PrecisionHawk’s LATAS (Low Altitude Traffic and Airspace Safety) safety platform will also be equipped with Skyward’s airspace intelligence tools. “This partnership with Skyward allows us to provide a complete commercial drone offering to the market,” PrecisionHawk Cofounder and President Christopher Dean said in a company press release . “We are excited to partner with Skyward and bring this holistic offering to our customer base.” Skyward CEO Jonathan Evans added, “PrecisionHawk provides best-in-class hardware and software for the agriculture, aggregates, insurance, and energy industries, and we’re proud to join forces to give these companies more tools to access the sky safely and grow their businesses. Drone operators need resources to efficiently manage fleets and get accurate airspace intelligence. This partnership builds on the robustness of the existing PrecisionHawk platform.” << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News The U.S. Department of the Interior will receive up to 40 small UAS from 3D Robotics thanks to a recently confirmed contract between the two. The aircraft that will be provided to the DOI weigh just over three pounds and include a variety of features, including easy customization for different missions and the capability of carrying a variety of sensors. The department will mainly use them to collect aerial data, but could also press them into service emergency and rescue efforts. Harry Humbert, deputy assistant secretary for Public Safety, Resource Protection, and Emergency Services, said, “the contract is extremely important to the department, as it will allow us to conduct many missions that were previously impossible due to limited resources and costs associated with using manned aircraft.” Mark Bathrick, service director of the department’s Office of Aviation, added, “the department expects to use these aircraft for a diverse set of missions including wildlife and vegetation surveys, fire management, search and rescue, hydrologic study, cultural resource inventory, and surface mining monitoring, just to name a few. These UAS will not only provide us with better science and reduce the risk to our employees, but they will result in cost savings and better service for the department and the American people.” << Back to the News
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An unmanned aircraft system is being tested in North Dakota to see if it is capable of helping with natural disaster relief efforts. Thanks to a half million-dollar spending budget from tech company Elbit Systems and utility holding company Xcel Energy, the UAS, Elbit’s Hermes 450, is being tested to see if it can provide assistance to crews that are working in different areas affected by disasters. “When you have a storm, when you have fires, getting crews on the ground to identify damage is flat-out dangerous,” President and CEO of Elbit Systems of America Raanan Horowitz said via an article on SFGate.com . The Hermes 450 is a 20-foot long UAS that can fly up to 17 hours, allowing it to cover 40,000 acres in an hour before needing to refuel. The hope is that because of the size and length of time that the UAS can fly, it will be able to collect more data, which will help when trying to get crews, material and equipment to the right locations. “The bottom line is, when you look at the size and the areas that you are trying to cover, when you look at the resolution, when you look at using sensors that can yield data that is actually usable, this is the way to go,” Horowitz said about the Hermes 450. Tests, which are being conducted through the Xcel Energy test program, are currently examining the UAS performance during a variety of possible emergency situations. The progress of the initial test flights was discussed at the North Dakota UAS Field Day on Monday. Photo of a Hermes 450, but not of the Israeli-built Elbit Systems Hermes 450. << Back to the News
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On Tuesday, Israeli-based Mobileye and United Kingdom-based Delphi Automotive PLC announced that they have partnered to create a SAE level 4/5 automated driving system, which will combine several technologies from each companies’ infrastructure to speed the time to market for driverless vehicles. Mobileye will use its EyeQ 4/5 System on a Chip with sensor signal processing, fusion, world view generation, and its Road Experience Management system. Delphi will use technology from a company that it recently acquired, Ottomatika, which includes automated driving software algorithms such as path and motion planning features and Delphi’s Multi-Domain Controller with a full camera, radar and LiDAR suite. Combined, all of these technologies will create the Central Sensing Localization and Planning (CSLP) system that the companies plan to offer as a turn-key, fully automated driving package, with the hope of rolling it out for production by 2019. SAE automation levels define the degree of driver assistance. Level 4 is high automation, which means the car can drive itself in some situations; level 5 is full automation, in which the car drives itself all the time. CSLP is the culmination of a relationship that is more than a decade old. “The Mobileye and Delphi relationship started in 2002 with the implementation of what was one of the most advanced active safety systems of the time,” said Mobileye Chairman and Chief Technology Officer Amnon Shashua in a press release published on Tuesday . “Our long history together is key to the success of this ambitious endeavor. Our partnership with Delphi will accelerate the time to market and enable customers to adopt Level 4/5 automation without the need for huge capital investments, thereby creating a formidable advantage for them.” In the same press release, Delphi President and CEO Kevin Clark spoke on the impact that the solution will have on future customers. “This partnership will allow us to give our customers an increased level of automated capabilities faster and more cost effectively. The collective expertise of our two organizations will accelerate the creation of new approaches and capabilities that would likely not have been possible working alone. This is a win-win for both companies and our customers.” << Back to the News
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Unmanned systems are used for a variety of reasons, and one tech company has created an unmanned aircraft system for the purposes of security and oversight. The system will be capable of approaching potential security threats in an effort to thwart an attack or alert the authorities about what’s going on. Based in San Francisco, Aptonomy Inc. will use previous technology from their DJI S-1000+ UAS, to create a newer version of this unmanned aerial system, with the idea of it being a “flying security guard.” The DJI S-1000+ will include a variety of added technologies including a new flight controller, a second computer and loudspeakers. The DJI S-1000+ will also have the ability to fly to charging stations to recharge when its batteries are dying. The modified UAS will have several capabilities making it useful in security protocol. It has artificial intelligence and navigational systems to provide optimal flight patterns. The technology of the UAS will also allow for it to be sent out to a specified location after it is picked through the company interface, and once it arrives at that location, it will be able to monitor human activities and read faces. Aptonomy is still in its startup stage, but it has already found one company interested in its latest product. An energy company has ordered the UAS for use at its oil refineries this year, and Aptonomy hopes that more companies follow suit and order these UAS for their security needs. << Back to the News
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by AUVSI News Next month, an unmanned aircraft system will be used to inspect the Sandusky River Bridge in Sandusky County, Ohio. The use of UAS for inspections could provide several potential benefits, including not having to close any portion of a bridge that ordinarily would have to be closed if inspected by a person. The use of an UAS will be a first for the Ohio Turnpike and Infrastructure Commission. According to an article from Cleveland.com , executive director of the turnpike Randy Cole was looking for a more efficient way of inspecting bridges, so when the opportunity to use unmanned systems arose, Cole jumped at the opportunity. When asked about using unmanned systems, Cole talked about his hopes for the new inspection tool. “We hope to determine if the use of a drone may reduce the time and expense and increase safety when performing these types of inspections on the turnpike and on the ODOT system,” said Cole. If the inspections go well, unmanned systems could be used for other purposes in the future, such as surveying accidents. “In a large pileup that happens on any of our interstates in this country, getting a drone through the traffic to see what's happening at the point of impact is safer and faster than trying to get humans and trucks through,” added Cole. To complete the inspection, the Ohio Turnpike and Infrastructure Commission will work with the Ohio/Indiana UAS Center, the Ohio Department of Transportation and a Switzerland-based UAS company called SenseFly, which manufactured the UAS being used for the inspection, which is called the Albris. The inspection of the bridge using the UAS is expected to take place on either Sept. 13 or 14, depending on weather conditions. The results of the inspection will be compared with results from a traditional inspection that come from an engineering firm called AECOM. << Back to the News
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by AUVSI News AutonomouStuff has announced a partnership with Quantum Corp, a data storage and management solutions company. The partnership will ultimately allow AutonomouStuff’s Automated Research Development Platform to include Quantum Corp’s solutions. Quantum Corp has helped more than 100,000 customers using their various solutions. “We are very proud to be working with Quantum, whose storage solutions are a great addition to our Automated Research Development Platform,” said AutonomouStuff CEO Bobby Hambrick through a statement released on Friday . “Quantum brings an intelligent and cost-effective approach to managing data storage, which is necessary to conduct advanced research for automated driving.” “The AutonomouStuff team understands that the fast pace of autonomy development requires agility and collaboration as engineering teams assess and deploy the latest technologies. Quantum’s intelligent storage solutions enable AutonomouStuff’s customers to reduce development cycles and control storage costs while effectively managing a mountain of vital data,” said Andy Brinck, vice president of channel sales for the Americas at Quantum. << Back to the News
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The largest military base in the world, Fort Bragg, will receive several MQ-1C Gray Eagle UAS very soon. By February, nine General Atomics Gray Eagles will be delivered to the North Carolina military installation and hosted there thanks to a $57 million budget from the military. Fort Bragg is no stranger to smaller unmanned aerial systems, but these latest systems will be the largest among their smaller UAS. According to Fort Bragg's Army stationing and installation plan manager Roger Vickers, the UAS will be ready for use almost immediately upon their arrival at Fort Bragg next year. "They expect the first flight some time in the spring of next year," said Vickers in an article with the Fayetteville Observer . Some of the features of the Gray Eagle are an ability to fly more than 24 hours, reaching heights up to 29,000 feet and a speed of up to 190 mph. It can also carry more than 1,000 pounds’ worth of equipment. << Back to the News
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Weekend Roundup

This Week in the Unmanned Systems and Robotics World A USV called SeaCharger recently completed a trip from California to Hawaii on solar power alone. It took 41 days for the small vessel to travel almost 2,500 miles. ( Energy Harvesting Journal ) The University of the Virgin Islands is using a “splash drone” to track and keep tabs on green sea turtles and hawksbill turtles. Both species of turtles are endangered. The drone was provided by the Virgin Islands Drone Services. ( UVI.edu ) The Navy is preparing to work on teaching robots how to interact with humans and how to do the right thing. One of the ways that the Navy is doing this is by using stories to teach the robots what behavior is acceptable. ( Stars and Stripes ) Airbus is planning to build an unmanned aircraft system for the primary purpose of transporting cargo. This system, known as Vahana, will also be capable of carrying passengers, similar to a taxi. ( Clean Technica ) In the future, Domino’s customers might receive their pizza from an autonomous vehicle, or a robot, according to company CEO Patrick Doyle. Domino’s has already built its own autonomous vehicle called DRU (Domino’s Robotic Unit). ( CNBC ) The U.K. Ministry of Defence ordered a third Zephyr-S UAS. The Zephyr-S can fly up to 70,000 feet and can fly for 45 days at a time. ( Gov.uk ) Several Japanese companies are working on 3-D maps for autonomous cars. The goal of the companies is to have the maps completed by the 2020 Olympics, which will be held in Tokyo. ( The Japan Times ) << Back to the News
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On Thursday, CNN announced the launch of their new initiative called CNN Aerial Imagery and Reporting, or CNN AIR. As a part of this initiative, CNN will use unmanned aircraft systems controlled by two full-time operators to cover news and events for CNN, Turner Broadcasting and Time Warner. CNN has played a significate part of the media’s entry into the world of unmanned systems. Back in 2015, they were one of three media companies that worked with the Federal Aviation Administration in an effort to come up with safe uses of UAS during the news-collecting process. Before this launch became official, CNN had already used UAS to document and report on events such as the floods in Louisiana and the Republican and Democratic presidential nominating conventions. “CNN’s cutting-edge development of technology to enhance the way we tell stories is a part of our DNA,” said Terence Burke, senior vice president of national news, via a press release published on Thursday . “We are proud to continue the tradition with CNN AIR and to establish a unit that will expand our technological capabilities for newsgathering.” << Back to the News
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Tweet by AUVSI News Mitsubishi Heavy Industries has created an “automated guideway transit system” in Japan. The driverless AGT system is believed to have a number of positive factors, chief among them, the ability to track malfunctions through sensors on the cars, leading to the quick resolution of issues that otherwise might not be found or would be found too late. The AGT system runs on rubber tires, which help with navigation through congested cities and areas, and concrete tracks. The system also doesn’t include any rails. Because of these factors, the costs to build this type of system are significantly cheaper than other railroad and subway systems. With an emphasis on lowering costs and timely traveling, the Japanese AGT system is believed to be the world’s fastest system, reaching a maximum speed near 75 mph. That is of the utmost importance in places like Japan, which is known for having a lot of people traveling via public transportation. Mitsubishi has plans to expand to other markets, with goals of reaching Africa and Southeast Asia in the near future. << Back to the News
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by AUVSI News In a matter of days, Uber customers in Pittsburgh will be able to ride in semi-autonomous cars to get from one destination to the other. While the cars will be mostly driverless, they will have someone in the driver’s seat monitoring the ride, and that driver will have the power to take control of the car in the event of an emergency. The cars are modified Volvo XC90 SUVs. By the end of the year, Volvo is expected to complete an order of 100 cars for Uber to use. Uber also plans to work with other automakers in a hope to get as many cars out on the street as possible. While Uber will initially have drivers in the car monitoring the drives, they plan to have fully autonomous cars on the road by 2021 if all goes well. “The goal is to wean us off of having drivers in the car,” said Travis Kalanick, Uber co-founder and CEO, in an interview with Bloomberg . With the technology still in its development and adjusting phase, humans will play an integral role in the initial testing of the cars. The present cars have difficulty navigating certain situation, like going over bridges, so the cars will transfer control over to the driver in those instances. The hope is that extremely detailed maps will alleviate these issues going forward. Humans will help with this process, as the cars currently being driven on the road collect data during their drives. Although the plan right now is to eventually have driverless cars as the primary, or only, option for Uber rides, Kalanick recognizes the importance of the human aspect in the development of technologies that will make that idea a reality. “Nobody has set up software that can reliably drive a car safely without a human,” said Kalanick. “We are focusing on that.” To help get these cars to full autonomy, Uber will also enlist the help of a company called Otto, a driverless truck startup that Uber is in the process of acquiring. Co-founder of Otto and former Google employee Anthony Levandowski will take over Uber’s driverless operations once the deal between the two companies is complete. The process of requesting an Uber will not be any different, as customers will still order their ride by the app. But the initial testing of the cars will be free. Representatives involved in the project hope that the prices for the rides in autonomous vehicles will be cheaper and more affordable than their human-driven counterparts, even for long trips. << Back to the News
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AUVSI President and CEO Brian Wynne to Speak at Virginia’s First-Ever Commonwealth Cyber Physical Summit Gov. McAuliffe to host gathering of premier cyber-physical professionals Sept. 20 to 22 in Newport News ARLINGTON, Va. — Brian Wynne, president and CEO of the Association for Unmanned Vehicles Systems International (AUVSI), will participate in Virginia’s first-ever Cyber Physical Systems Summit. The summit, hosted by Gov. Terry McAuliffe, will take place Sept. 20 to 22 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News, Virginia. It will bring together experts on autonomous systems, cyber-security and critical infrastructure from across several industries. In addition to roundtable discussions, participants will learn insights from leading cyber-physical experts on how to prepare for the cyber-physical challenge and how to develop a culture of awareness and preparedness in order to successfully defend against ever-increasing cyber-physical threats. The summit will also feature remarks from Gov. McAuliffe, U.S. Sen. Mark Warner and Neil Hershfield, deputy director, ICS-CERT, U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security. The summit is being conducted with the National Governors Association and is a component of Gov. McAuliffe’s National Governors Associations Chair’s Initiative Meet the Threat—States Confront the Cyber Challenge , which seeks to educate and prepare states for cyber incidents. AUVSI is a partner in the conference, along with Amazon Web Services, MITRE, Old Dominion Electric Cooperative, Verizon, Virginia Tech and others. For additional information and registration, please visit https://cyberva.virginia.gov/cyber-physical-summit/ About AUVSI The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) — the world's largest nonprofit organization dedicated to the advancement of unmanned systems and robotics — represents more than 7,500 members from more than 60 countries involved in the fields of government, industry and academia. AUVSI members work in the defense, civil and commercial markets.
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Sinclair Community College in Dayton, Ohio, introduced their mobile ground control station Tuesday at the Unmanned Aerial Systems conference at the Dayton Convention Center. The station will be enlisted to help with the training in UAS control and operations, through combining live UAS with virtual simulations. The training station was created through a collaboration between the school’s National UAS Training and Certification Center, and two other companies. A representative from one of those companies, Simlat Ltd. of Israel, spoke on the potential impact of the station in an article from the Daily Dayton News . “This leap makes a big difference because then nobody is taking risks and the cost would usually drop,” said Chief Technology Officer Roy Peshin. Formerly an ambulance, the station is valued at $300,000. The hope is that the station can create an easier and more cost efficient training process of UAS operations. Students at the college, as well as corporate clients, will be the beneficiaries of the training provided via the station. << Back to the News
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On Tuesday, Ford Motor Co. announced its blueprint for expanding its outreach in the world of autonomous driving. Among the many ideas that Ford has in store are plans to put fully autonomous ride sharing and hailing vehicles on the road by 2021, as well as plans to expand its operations in Silicon Valley, California. To do this, Ford is either investing in or partnering with four different companies that work in the field of driverless technology. “The next decade will be defined by automation of the automobile, and we see autonomous vehicles as having as significant an impact on society as Ford’s moving assembly line did 100 years ago,” says Ford President and CEO Mark Fields. The goal for Ford is to create driverless vehicles for ride sharing and hailing, a move being dubbed by many as “driverless Uber,” so that they can be on the road and functional in five years. These vehicles will be without a steering wheel or gas and brake pedals. Testing of these vehicles will take place in California, Arizona and Michigan, with plans to test more vehicles in the near future to continue improving on current technology. “We’re dedicated to putting on the road an autonomous vehicle that can improve safety and solve social and environmental challenges for millions of people — not just those who can afford luxury vehicles,” adds Fields. To help with its continued development in the field of autonomy and driverless cars, Ford has enlisted the help of four companies: Velodyne, SAIPS, Nirenberg Neuroscience LLC and Civil Maps. Each company, using expertise in its respective field, will help Ford bring the idea of these fully autonomous vehicles to reality. In regards to the expansion efforts in its company-affiliated headquarters in California, Ford is doubling its staff on its Palo Alto campus. For the expansion in Silicon Valley, two new buildings will be built in the current location and 150,000 square feet worth of work and lab space will also be added. “Our presence in Silicon Valley has been integral to accelerating our learning and deliverables driving Ford Smart Mobility,” says Ken Washington, vice president of research and advanced engineering at Ford. “Our goal was to become a member of the community. Today, we are actively working with more than 40 startups and have developed a strong collaboration with many incubators, allowing us to accelerate development of technologies and services.” The Palo Alto campus currently has a working staff of more than 130 people, which includes researchers, engineers and scientists. Ford’s entire press release can be read via this link . << Back to the News
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The Air Force will receive 30 MQ-9 Reaper UAS by May of 2019, courtesy of a nearly $400 million contract with General Atomics. Once delivered to the Air Force, the unmanned aircraft systems will have a variety of duties to perform. Known as an armed, multi-mission, medium-altitude, long-endurance remotely piloted aircraft, the MQ-9 Reapers will include several unique features. They have a flight time of more than 24 hours, will have operational heights reaching 50,000 feet and will also be able to fly at more than 276 mph. The Reapers will also have almost 4,000 pounds’ worth of payload capacity. The Reaper will be used for the collection of intelligence, as well as against dynamic targets. << Back to the News
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